pacific northwest

Cascadian Cuisine Initiative Kicks Off in PDX

food association logoLast month in Portland Oregon, the World Food Travel Association officially kicked off Cascadian Cuisine, a new initiative focused on the continuing promotion of food found, cooked and created throughout the Pacific Northwest. The conference brought tourism offices, food & drink producers, association leaders, wineries, brewers, chefs and journalists together for a full day of strategic planning & thought leadership, with the goal that the regional awareness will drive consumer consciousness, create jobs, and support responsible and local tourism efforts of communities across the bioregion. At the meeting, the Association welcomed some of the most fervent food, drink and tourism players in the region to discuss topics such as borders, agricultural hallmarks, local entrepreneurship and sustainability in Cascadia. Erik Wolf, Executive Director of WFTA explained the vision, “At its very core, Cascadian Cuisine is about economic, sustainable and community development – bringing awareness, creating jobs, and preserving communities and the culinary culture of our region.”

Cascadian Cuisine draws deeply on the passion and unsurpassed quality of food and drink found in the bio-region that includes northwestern California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Idaho and western Montana. In other words, as Jason French, Chef/Owner at Portland’s popular Ned Ludd Restaurant, says “the quality of our food and drink is very much grounded in the quality of the agricultural products found in Cascadia.”

For more information, including how to get involved with this project, please contact Executive Director of the WFTA, Erik Wolf at erik@worldfoodtravel.org OR (+1) 503-213-3700

Cascadia Hacks: New Pacific Northwest Tech Collective

Iphone Cell Phone Case

Iphone Cell Phone CaseLast month, the group Cascadia Hacks was officially formed to facilitate coordination between Cascadian tech communities here in the Pacific Northwest. Their goal is to increase open source collaboration, creativity and provide an established infrastructure for new projects. From the core urban centers of Portland, Seattle and Vancouver BC to the smaller cities and remote areas of the region, this effort works to bridge communication gaps, create a better facility for networking, notifications for upcoming events (such as Cascadia Ruby, Cascadia IT Conf or many others) and to generally help increase the awareness of what each city, area and group brings to the Pacific Northwest. It might be game design, crypto-parties, Tor development, open governance software, graphic design or establishing urban spaces and creative villages to help support the continued role that tech communities play.

Cascadia Hacks is not politically affiliated, but instead seeks to help with the underlying mission of bringing together the individuals and communities throughout the bioregion.

Stay tuned as they create a more solidified organization structure, bridge the topology and geography and generally bring people together to make things happen!

If you’re interested in helping out, joining in activities or you’re inventing the next Internet of Things device that will teleport us into the future you can contact @cascadiahacks or @adron on twitter, or read more from their website here:

http://compositecode.com/cascadia-hacks/

The way our money moves: Cascadia defined by regional economy

cascadiausallmap

In a recent article published on Facts CoExist theoretical physicist Dirk Brockmann argues that state boundaries are often arbitrary and out of date, no longer representative of how we communicate or function as a modern society. By tracking dollar bills he has created a series of maps redrawing state borders by how our money moves, which more accurately portrays distinctive areas based on regional economy.

When mapped in this fashion, Cascadia once again emerges, clearly delineated along a bioregional line.

cascadiamapseattle

Analyzing data from millions of single dollars, using information provided by the WheresGeorge.com project, Brockmann determined that state boundaries no longer correlate with how we move or communicate with each other. WheresGeorge.com is a grassroots money tracking group in which users enter zip codes and serial numbers of dollar bills, stamping each one so that when other users find it, it can be relogged. Each time this happens, users receive a hit, the top ‘Georger’ at the moment being an ammunition dealer who has logged more than two million bills, with roughly 500,000 hits.

Brockmann took the data for how the dollar bills traveled, and used network theory to draw lines where dollar bills are less likely to cross. The resulting map shows how "effective communities" don’t necessarily follow state lines.

This research continues to build on a wide range of data visualizations that support the idea of Cascadia as socially, linguistically, economically, environmentally and politically distinct from surrounding regions. The work builds on research released in December by MIT Senseable Cities Lab who working with AT&T defined regions based on who people communicate with, through social media and via telephone.

Cascadia Megaregion MapThe result findings are also very similar to what the federal policy and planning organization America 2050 has argued, defining roughly 11 megaregions in the United States. America 2050 is Regional Plan Association’s national infrastructure planning and policy program, providing leadership on a broad range of transportation, sustainability, and economic-development issues impacting America’s growth in the 21st century. Investigating these social interactions reveals interesting patterns for how people utilize space, and more than that, interact not only within that space, but with society at large, between neighborhood, city, county, state and region, defining what community really means in 21st century America.

In this newly regional model, cities play an important role, helping to pull nearby counties into their radius of influence, create commuting patterns, influence economic and environmental landscapes, and when they overlap, combine to create a new form of spatial geography and interaction known in the Pacific Northwest as the Cascadia Megaregion, defined as an area where “boundaries begin to blur, creating a new scale of geography”. These areas have interlocking economic systems, shared natural resources and ecosystems, and common transportation systems link these population centers together. In the Pacific Northwest, the Cascadia megaregion contains 17% of Cascadian land mass, but more than 80% of the Cascadian population.

These arguments also help to strengthen the idea that while we here in the Pacific Northwest are a part of very large countries, the United States and Canada, we still possess distinct cultural elements – language, literature, affiliations, communications – and an awareness of ourselves as members of a community which extends throughout our region, rendering many traditional boundaries obsolete and irrelevant.

The Connected States of Cascadia - MIT Study Shows More Connected than Ever Before

Researchers at MIT Senseable City Lab, working with AT&T Labs and IBM Research have revealed a very nice set of data visualizations that redefines regional boundaries within the United States, using patterns of social connectedness derived from aggregated cellphone communication patterns. The project, "The Connected States of America" illustrates emerging communities defined by social interaction. The Cascadia bioregion features prominently in the illustrations, with the connections helping to better represent the social and cultural realities that are emerging in the Pacific Northwest, and the increasing fragmentation and cultural clustering currently underway throughout the rest of the country.

"Our interactions define new communities... which go beyond traditional state boundaries... with states splitting and merging together "

The data visualizations were derived from 2011 studies by looking at billions of instances of aggregated cell phone communications, working to redefine communities through the informal lens of social networks, hopefully allowing policy makers to utilize the data to increase the democratic process. Carlo Rotti, director of MIT Senseable Labs stated: "We are particularly interested in how such rich information can help us gain a better understanding of our society, which in the future, could lead to more democratic, bottom-up structures of governance."

Investigating these social interactions reveals interesting patterns for how people utilize space, and more than that, interact not only within that space, but with society at large, between neighborhood, city, county, state and region, defining what community really means in 21st century America. In this newly regional model, cities play an important role, helping to pull nearby counties into their radius of influence, create commuting patterns, influence economic and environmental landscapes, and when they overlap, combine to create a new form of spatial geography and interaction known in the Pacific Northwest as the Cascadia Megaregion.

In addition to this, working on a bioregional framework also appears to be important and researchers found that Mountain ranges and other geographic features influence how people interact, because they contribute to an increased perception of distance and therefore hinder communication.

The result findings are also very similar to what the federal policy and planning organization America 2050 has argued, defining roughly 11 megaregions in the United States. America 2050 is Regional Plan Association's national infrastructure planning and policy program, providing leadership on a broad range of transportation, sustainability, and economic-development issues impacting America's growth in the 21st century.

A megaregion is defined as an area where “boundaries begin to blur, creating a new scale of geography”. These areas have interlocking economic systems, shared natural resources and ecosystems, and common transportation systems link these population centers together. In the Pacific Northwest, the Cascadia megaregion contains 17% of Cascadian land mass, but more than 80% of the Cascadian population.

These arguments also help to strengthen the idea that while we here in the Pacific Northwest are a part of very large countries, the United States and Canada, we still possess distinct cultural elements – language, literature, affiliations, communications – and an awareness of ourselves as members of a community which extends throughout our region, rendering many traditional boundaries obsolete and irrelevant. This idea of common bonds and character – are transmitted through media, newsprint, education, sports, and at it’s base root – our individual communications on an interpersonal level.

The Pacific Northwest is unique – in North America, and in the world abroad. We continue to be connected in ways that challenge traditional modes of governance, aspiring to better ways of conceiving of community, locality, geography, and ecology.

More information can be found on the MIT website: http://senseable.mit.edu/csa/

Towards a Cascadia Football Federation and the 2016 VIVA World Cup [Updated]

As the 2012 league season came to halt for all three Cascadia clubs, organizers working with the newly established Cascadia Football Association have been pushing towards making the idea of fielding a Cascadia National Team a reality.

For those not aware, the Cascadian Football Association is a small but growing group of people who are creating the infrastructure necessary for the creation of a Cascadia representational team though the process of application and hopefully acceptance by the NF-Board, the organization which oversees Non-FIFA football around the world. Every two years the NF-Board organizes the VIVA World Cup, which one of its 27 member Football Associations (FAs) hosts.

Cascadia as a distinct cultural entity, bioregion and growing social movement with common interests across international lines can and should be represented in the sport which we in Cascadia are passionate about; football connects us to other similar communities, cultures and peoples around the globe, and can be a great way to help foster a sense of place and regional identity. For that reason the organizers’ aim is a simple one: To have Cascadia participate as a member FA in the 2014 or 2016 VIVA World Cup. For more information, we also encourage people to read our earlier introduction to the effort here: http://www.cascadianow.org/towards-a-cascadia-soccer-federation-and-the-2016-viva-world-cup/

This idea has been floated around for several years now, and continues to gain support from various different Pacific Northwest Football and Soccer blogs. Stumptown Footy has also done a very nice piece recently updated on what a Cascadia Mens National Team may look like: http://www.stumptownfooty.com/2012/2/15/2800601/cascadia-assembling-cascadian-mens-national-team

While not affiliated in any way with the Cascadian Independence Project, we are very excited to announce they have released several updates on their Facebook page in relation to the creation of a Cascadia National Team, including:

  • Established an Interim President, Acting Secretary and Communications Officer for the CFA. Permanent positions and appointments for these and other offices will take place at the first General Meeting which will be upcoming in January. The meeting is open, and anyone interested in attending should email group organizers for more information.
  • Reached out to and are in communications with Cascadia kit and scarf makers.
  • Reached out to the Sealand Football Association, reaching out to the Quebec FA and other FA's for fact-finding and guidance in the process.
  • Gained the support of a French/English translator to help with communications with Francophone FA's and the NF-Board in Brussels.
  • Reached out to and are in communication with the CSANF, the Consejo Sudamericano de Nuevas Federaciones - South America’s non-FIFA Confederation. Our Acting Secretary is bi-lingual in English and Spanish.
  • Joined a non-FIFA football forum to further network with NF-Board FA’s such as Raetia to learn more about the application process so that we can proceed with it smoothly.
  • Preparing an official communique and letter of intent for the NF-Board in Brussels who we hear are now aware of and interested in our efforts.
  • Looking into the possibility of having an observer at the NF-Board’s February General Meeting in Munich, Germany. This will be discussed at the CAFF General Meeting in January.
  • Looking into potential venues for our January General Meeting. They are open to suggestions as want as many to attend as possible.
  • In contact with people both familiar with forming non-profit organizations and with people involved in other non-FIFA football such as the 2006 FIFI Wild Cup.
  • Identification of over 75 eligible pro and semi-pro players based on a fairly conservative selection criteria.

The claim for Cascadia representation is based both upon our common past as Cascadia was once briefly a single political unit: the Oregon Territory – shared by several nations, as well as our present as the nexus of incredible support for the sport in North America which we and the world all love.

And the claim is also based on our common future as a region, and a culture.

For those looking for more information or who would like to get involved, check out: 

http://www.facebook.com/CascadiaFootball

http://twitter.com/cascadiafootball

Explorations of Cascadian Cartography Exhibit in Portland

CascadiaExplorations

Explorations of Cascadian Cartography – A new map themed gallery set up for the duration of the 2012 North American Cartography Information Society (NACIS) in Portland OR, will be running at the White Stag building through December 10th.

The North American Cartographic Information Society, founded in 1980, is an organization comprised of specialists from private, academic, and government organizations whose common interest lies in facilitating communication in the map information community. Their goals are to improve communication, coordination and cooperation among the producers, disseminators, curators, and users of cartographic information.

This year’s conference was the first hosted in Cascadia since 2004, which continues to be at the forefront regional geographic, social, and spatial mapping projects. This emerging trend of mapping Cascadia will also continue this weekend, with the Decolonizing Cascadia, the 7th Annual Regional Mini-Conference being hosted by the University of British Columbia, in collaboration with geography departments around the Pacific Northwest to talk about newly emerging formations, and what these social and economic developments might mean for a continuingly connected and integrated region.

For directions, the White Stag Building is a part of the University of Oregon campus, located on Northwest Naito Parkway and West Burnside Street.

Cascadia Now! October Newsletter

@ellejohara

<< September | October Edition

In this October edition of the Cascadia Monthly:

[gview file="http://cascadianow.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Cascadian102012.pdf"]

Anyone should feel free to download, print and distribute as they see fit.

A big thanks to our layout editor Vickie Phelps and Adam Munson.

The Cascadia Monthly newsletter is a free monthly newsletter. We have a completely open submission policy and welcome any and all articles related to Cascadia and the Pacific Northwest, though we ask that they not be politically affiliated. Articles that violate our mission statement will also likely not be included.

Submit related Cascadia content, pictures, articles, events or contributions to our editor Adam Munson at

desolatesorrows@gmail.com

Previous Editions:

Occupied Cascadia Documentary to Premier October 6th

Occupied Cascadia is a documentary film both journalistic and expressionistic.  Exploring the emerging understanding of bioregionalism within the lands and waters of the Northeast Pacific Rim, the filmmakers interweave intimate landscape portraits with human voices both ideological and indigenous.  Stories from the land contrast critique of dominant culture, while an embrace of the radical unknown informs a re-birthed and growing culture of resistance.  Filming began during the outset of the populist “Occupy” movement, and finished by joining the voices seeking to re-contextualize popular revolt within our life-world as a movement to decolonize, un-occupy, and re-inhabit the living Earth through deep understanding and identification with our specific bioregions.

Cascadia Matters is a grass roots organization made up by a collective effort of writers, artists, educators and media activists. They aim to highlight the emerging ideas, struggles and times of the Cascadia bioregion and beyond. In order to effectively provide clean air and clean water for future generations, our attention must not only shift towards the bioregions of the Pacific Northwest, but also towards stopping corrosive agendas within them. The diverse voices throughout this land have forged the way for many movements and there is a growing necessity to inspire a unified culture of resistance. This film promotes that dialogue through bioregional awareness.

This specific campaign is of the utmost importance in starting the dialog needed to confront the dominate culture in our effort to move towards true sustainability.  They will be traveling throughout the bioregion, as far as the funds raised will take us. To these ends Cascadia Matters is working on a fundraiser to help put together a Pacific Northwest film screening tour in cities throughout Cascadia. Those who would like to support this idea should donate here: http://www.indiegogo.com/occupiedcascadia.

The film will be screening on October 6th at 7pm in Tower Theater, Bend OR. Updates will continue to be posted here as we get more information about their developing film tour: Time: Sat, Oct 6th, 7pm Place: Tower Theater 835 NW Wall Street Bend, OR More info at http://cascadiamatters.org.

2012 Cascadia Olympians: Full Listing and Standings

Cascadia Olympics Logo

Below is a full listing of 2012 Olympic athletes from around the Pacific Northwest, their event, standing and rank. A big thank you to reddit user Khavanon, who has been meticulously keeping track of the statistics on this Reddit thread. (FINAL) Last updated August 13th 2012.   

CASCADIA (93 athletes):

Final Standings:

  • 11th in the world if including team medals
  • 29th in the world if excluding team medals

*Rankings calculated after removing Cascadians from USA/Canada's non-team medal count. *Effect of team medals in rankings noted due to some team members coming from outside Cascadia.

  • Total Medals: 21 (6 GOLD, 8 SILVER, 7 BRONZE)
  • Individual Medals: 8 (2 GOLD, 2 SILVER, 4 BRONZE)
  • Team Medals: 13 (4 GOLD, 6 SILVER, 3 BRONZE)

CASCADIA OLYMPIANS

(Some names may appear more than once for differing events; some team competitors combine for one medal)


 

Athlete City Gender Event (with video) Team Event

Gold

Nathan Adrian Bremerton

M

SWIMMING, 100M FREESTYLE No

Gold

Ashton Eaton Bend

M

TRACK & FIELD, DECATHLON(a.k.a. the competition forWorld's Greatest Athlete) No

Gold

Nathan Adrian Bremerton

M

SWIMMING, 4x100M MEDLEY RELAY Yes

Gold

Hope Solo Richland

F

SOCCER (GOALKEEPER) Yes

Gold

Elsie Windes Beaverton

F

WATER POLO (DEFENDER) Yes

Gold

Kevin Love Lake Oswego

M

BASKETBALL (FORWARD) Yes

Silver

Ryan Cochrane Victoria

M

SWIMMING, 1,500M FREESTYLE No

Silver

Galen Rupp Portland

M

TRACK & FIELD, 10,000M No

Silver

Nathan Adrian Bremerton

M

SWIMMING, 4x100M FREESTYLE RELAY Yes

Silver

Malcolm Howard Victoria

M

ROWING, EIGHT WITH COXSWAIN Yes (with Bergen)

Silver

Gabe Bergen 100 Mile House

M

ROWING, EIGHT WITH COXSWAIN Yes (with Howard)

Silver

Krista Guloien Port Moody

F

ROWING, EIGHT WITH COXSWAIN Yes (with Marquardt/Wilkinson)

Silver

Darcy Marquardt Richmond

F

ROWING, EIGHT WITH COXSWAIN Yes (with Guloien/Wilkinson)

Silver

Lauren Wilkinson North Vancouver

F

ROWING, EIGHT WITH COXSWAIN Yes (with Guloien/Marquardt)

Silver

Jennie Reed Seattle

F

CYCLING, TEAM PURSUIT Yes

Silver

Courtney Thompson Kent

F

VOLLEYBALL (SETTER) Yes

Silver

Ryan Bailey Portland

M

TRACK & FIELD, 4x100M RELAY Yes

Bronze

Marti Malloy Oak Harbor

F

JUDO, LIGHTWEIGHT (52-58KG) No

Bronze

Christine Girard White Rock

F

WEIGHTLIFTING, 58-63KG No

Bronze

Brent Hayden Mission

M

SWIMMING, 100M FREESTYLE No

Bronze

Richard Weinberger Surrey

M

SWIMMING, 10KM MARATHON No

Bronze

Adrienne Martelli University Place

F

ROWING, QUADRUPLE SCULLS WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes

Bronze

Gillian Carleton Victoria

F

CYCLING, PURSUIT Yes (with Glaesser)

Bronze

Jasmin Glaesser Coquitlam

F

CYCLING, PURSUIT Yes (with Carleton)

Bronze

Emily Zurrer Duncan

F

SOCCER (DEFENDER) Yes (with Sinclair/Timko/LeBlanc/Schmidt)

Bronze

Christine Sinclair Burnaby

F

SOCCER (FORWARD) Yes (with Zurrer/Timko/LeBlanc/Schmidt)

Bronze

Brittany Timko Coquitlam

F

SOCCER (FORWARD) Yes (with Zurrer/Sinclair/LeBlanc/Schmidt)

Bronze

Karina LeBlanc Maple Ridge

F

SOCCER (GOAL KEEPER) Yes (with Zurrer/Sinclair/Timko/Schmidt)

Bronze

Sophie Schmidt Abbotsford

F

SOCCER (MIDFIELDER) Yes (with Zurrer/Sinclair/Timko/LeBlanc)

4th

Mariel Zagunis Beaverton

F

FENCING, SABER No (also USA FLAG BEARER)

4th

Seth Kelsey Portland

M

FENCING, EPEE No

5th

Ariana Kukors Auburn

F

SWIMMING, 200M INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY No

5th

Dylan Armstrong Kamloops

M

TRACK & FIELD, SHOT PUT No

5th

Ryan Bailey Portland

M

TRACK & FIELD, 100M No

T-5th

Travis Stevens Tacoma

M

JUDO, HALF-MIDDLEWEIGHT (73-81KG) No

T-5th

Matthew Gentry Burnaby

M

WRESTLING, FREESTYLE 74KG No

T-5th

Teresa Gabriele Mission

F

BASKETBALL, (GUARD) Yes (with Smith)

T-5th

Kim Smith Mission

F

BASKETBALL (GUARD) Yes (with Gabriele)

6th

Michael Braithwaite Duncan

M

ROWING, DOUBLE SCULLS Yes

6th

David Calder Victoria

M

ROWING, PAIR WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes (with Frandsen, all Cascadian)

6th

Scott Frandsen Kelowna

M

ROWING, PAIR WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes (with Calder, all Cascadian)

T-6th

Rich Fellers Wilsonville

M

EQUESTRIAN, TEAM JUMPING Yes

7th

Brittany Rogers Coquitlam

F

GYMNASTICS, HORSE VAULT No

7th

Galen Rupp Portland

M

TRACK & FIELD, 5000M No

8th

Zachary Plavsic Vancouver

M

SAILING, RS:X - WINDSURFER No

8th

Michael Mason Nanoose Bay

M

TRACK & FIELD, HIGH JUMP No

8th

Geoff Kabush Courteney

M

CYCLING, CROSS-COUNTRY No

8th

Lindsay Jennerich Victoria

F

ROWING, LIGHTWEIGHT DOUBLE SCULLS Yes (with Jennerich, all Cascadian)

8th

Patricia Obee Victoria

F

ROWING, LIGHTWEIGHT DOUBLE SCULLS Yes (with Obee, all Cascadian)

8th

Brent Hayden Mission

M

SWIMMING, 4x100 MEDLEY RELAY Yes

9th

Ryan Cochrane Victoria

M

SWIMMING, 400M FREESTYLE No

9th

Zach Bell North Vancouver

M

CYCLING, OMNIUM No

9th

Catharine Pendrel Kamloops

F

CYCLING, CROSS COUNTRY No

T-9th

Quanitta Underwood Seattle

F

BOXING, LIGHTWEIGHT (51-60KG) No

T-9th

Kelsey Campbell Milwaukie

F

WRESTLING, FREESTYLE 55KG No

T-9th

Arjan Bhullar Richmond

M

WRESTLING, FREESTYLE 120KG No

T-9th

Haislan Garcia Coquitlam

M

WRESTLING, FREESTYLE 66KG No

T-9th

Tobias Ng Vancouver

M

BADMITTON, MIXED DOUBLES Yes

T-9th

Vasek Pospisil Vancouver

M

TENNIS, DOUBLES Yes

T-9th

Andre Ho Richmond

M

TABLE TENNIS, TEAM Yes

10th

Nikola Girke West Vancouver

F

SAILING, RS:X - WINDSURFER No

10th

Thomas Gossland Vancouver

M

SWIMMING, 4x100M FREESTYLE RELAY Yes (with Hayden)

10th

Brent Hayden Mission

M

SWIMMING, 4x100M FREESTYLE RELAY Yes (with Gossland)

11th

Alexa Komarnycky Victoria

F

SWIMMING, 800M FREESTYLE No

11th

Riley McCormick Victoria

M

DIVING, 10M PLATFORM No

11th

William Dean Kelowna

M

ROWING, FOUR WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes (with Jacob/Wilkinson)

11th

Anthony Jacob Victoria

M

ROWING, FOUR WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes (with Dean/Wilkinson)

11th

Michael Wilkinson North Vancouver

M

ROWING, FOUR WITHOUT COXSWAIN Yes (with Dean/Jacob)

12th

Elizabeth Gleadle Vancouver

F

TRACK & FIELD, JAVELIN No

12th

Richard Clarke Salt Spring Island

M

SAILING, STAR - KEELBOAT Yes

13th

Inaki Gomez Vancouver

M

TRACK & FIELD, 20KM RACE WALK No

13th

Aretha Thurmond Seattle

F

TRACK & FIELD, DISCUS No

13th

Rebecca Howard Salmon Arm

F

EQUESTRIAN, TEAM EVENTING Yes

T-13th

Brad Walker Spokane

M

TRACK & FIELD, POLE VAULT No

14th

Cameron Levins Black Creek

M

TRACK & FIELD, 5000M No

T-14th

Brent Hayden Mission

M

SWIMMING, 50M FREESTYLE No

15th

Amanda Furrer Spokane

F

SHOOTING, 50M STANDARD RIFLE THREE POSITIONS (3x20 SHOTS) No

16th

Eric Uptagrafft Spokane

M

SHOOTING, 50M FREE RIFLE PRONE (60 SHOTS) No

16th

Brittany Rogers Coquitlam

F

GYMNASTICS, UNEVEN PARALLEL BARS No

16th

Hunter Lowden West Vancouver

M

SAILING, 49ER SKIFF Yes

17th

Blake Worsley Vancouver

M

SWIMMING, 200M FREESTYLE No

T-17th

Monica Peterson Victoria

F

FENCING, FOIL No

T-17th

Martin Reader Comox Valley

M

BEACH VOLLEYBALL, PAIRS Yes

18th

Hilary Caldwell White Rock

F

SWIMMING, 200M BACKSTROKE No

20th

Tory Nyhaug Coquitlam

M

CYCLING, BMX No

22nd

Jessica Smith North Vancouver

F

TRACK & FIELD, 800m No

22nd

Curtis Moss Burnaby

M

TRACK & FIELD, JAVELIN No

23rd

Alec Page Victoria

M

SWIMMING, 400M INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY No

24th

Rachel Yurkovich Newberg

F

TRACK & FIELD, JAVELIN No

25th

Mike Leigh Vancouver

M

SAILING, 470 No

25th

Luke Ramsay Vancouver

M

SAILING, 470 - TWO PERSON DINGHY Yes

27th

Brent McMahon Victoria

M

TRIATHLON No

28th

Ryder Hesjedal Victoria

M

CYCLING, TIME TRIAL No

31st

Jarred Rome Marysville

M

TRACK & FIELD, DISCUS No

31st

Kara Patterson Vancouver (WA)

F

TRACK & FIELD, JAVELIN No

32nd

Cyrus Hostetler Newberg

M

TRACK & FIELD, JAVELIN No

33rd

Tyler Farrar Wenatchee

M

CYCLING, ROAD RACE No

T-33rd

Andre Ho Richmond

M

TABLE TENNIS, SINGLES No

T-33rd

Vasek Pospisil Vancouver

M

TENNIS, SINGLES No

34th

Dorothy Ludwig Langley

F

SHOOTING, 10M AIR PISTOL No

T-38th

Justin Rodhe Kamloops

M

TRACK & FIELD, SHOT PUT No

T-43rd

Max Plaxton Victoria

M

CYCLING, CROSS-COUNTRY No

55th

Simon Whitfield Victoria

M

TRIATHLON No (also CANADA FLAG BEARER)

T-59th

Hawley Bennett-Awad Murrayville

F

EQUESTRIAN, INDIVIDUAL EVENTING No

63rd

Ryder Hesjedal Victoria

M

CYCLING, ROAD RACE No